Here’s How You Can Earn Up To S$13,000 In Side Income

Here’s How You Can Earn Up To S$13,000 In Side Income

Living in one of the most expensive cities in the world means that the race to scurry away money for savings or even just to make ends meet is a never-ending battle. Having a full-time job that pays well enough is a blessing, but for those who need that extra boost in income, having another job on the side can be really helpful.

Not only that, even if the additional cash isn’t a matter of urgency, a side income job may help you explore an alternative career that’s on your mind.

Here are jobs that you can take on to help you with your cash flow.

TutoringPart time tutor

Private tutoring is the Singaporean undergraduate’s favourite job that actually pays well and isn’t hard to pick up. If you are a graduate, you can expect to charge between S$35-40 for an hour of tuition with a lower Secondary pupil and even up to S$60 if you’re teaching JC students. Star private tutors who market themselves well can earn a lot higher than that.

In terms of pay per hour and flexibility, tutoring remains a really financially attractive option if you have the patience and ability to teach.

Assuming you spend four hours a week to tutor lower secondary level pupils, here’s how much you can earn in a month, and a year!

Number of hours in a weekFees per hourTotal fees in a month
8 hoursS$35(8 hours x 4 weeks) x S$35
= S$1,120

In a year, you will be pocketing S$13,440. As there are many online tutor agencies that you can sign up with, all you have to do is to pay the initial commission fee, which varies, or go with word of mouth advertising.

Getting a steady stream of students usually isn’t a difficult matter, though you do have to be selective about your students if you want to minimise the travel time from one home to another.

Also, you need to take into account the preparation time for lessons, so if you specialise in teaching one or two subjects in the same grade, you may be able to work more efficiently.

Uber or GrabCar driving

Have a car and want to make it earn money for you? Being an Uber or GrabCar driver can be a very sensible option that allows you to take advantage of the very expensive car you have and doesn’t involve too much preparation work.

All you need is just time spent on the roads and perhaps some openness to dealing with potentially awkward conversations with complete strangers.

How much you earn per hour really depends on how much and what time you drive. If you have your own car, your net profit will be higher and with frequent incentives given by the companies, you can expect to earn around S$25 per hour on average.

Number of hours per weekFees per hourTotal fees in a month
8 hoursS$258 hours x 4 weeks x S$25 = S$800

Ridesharing can rake in S$9,600 a year with just eight hours of driving per week. To fully enjoy this source of income, why not get a card that helps you save up to 20.88% on fuel?

Citi Cash Back Card

Citi Cash Back Card

Up to 20.88% petrol savings + 8% cash back daily

Enjoy up to S$120 cash back and 7 free Grab rides

Be a shopperpersonal shopper

Are you someone who loves grocery shopping and gets a thrill out of going down the shopping list and ticking each item off? If you are, then being a shopper could just be your side gig while you shop for yourself.

Honestbee pays up to S$11 an hour to do grocery shopping and up to S$22 an hour if you have a car and want to do deliveries.

You don’t need qualifications or too much brain power for this side gig, plus you get the benefits of retail therapy vicariously through shopping for customers.

There is hardly any ‘barriers to entry’ for this one as you need neither qualifications nor a car, but on the downside the earnings per hour are low.

Number of hours per weekFees per hourTotal fees in a month
8S$22 (driving)8 hours x 4 weeks x S$22 = S$704
8 S$11 (shopping)8 hours x 4 weeks x S$11 = S$352

Freelancing

Freelancing could be your side-gig turned full-time job if you get really serious about it. Depending on the work experience that you already have and the industry that you are in, freelancing can earn you anything from peanuts to a good salary. You don’t need to freelance in an area that you’re already an expert in, but instead you can use this as a way to develop an interest that you are good at.

You can teach yoga, start getting photography clients, sing at weddings, or be a consultant.

Assuming you’re an editor with a few years of experience, your average rate could be S$35 per hour or more if you work with clients based in the US or UK due to exchange rates.

As a freelancer, the hourly rate can differ greatly depending on the industry and years of experience you have. However, you do have to be responsible for getting your own clients and ensuring a regular stream of customers, which is why freelancing is a good idea for a side-gig but a little risky as a full-time job.

Number of hours in a weekFees per hourTotal fees in a month
8 hoursS$35(8 hours x 4 weeks) x S$35
= S$1,120

That’s a handsome S$13,440 in a year! If you have a skill that is in demand, offer your services. You can make use of platforms like freelancer.com or upwork.com to build up a steady group of clients. However, these platforms charge a commission. Check the terms and conditions before you sign up.

Offer an experience on Airbnb

Offer your place for AirBnb

Do you have an experience that you can’t wait to share with visitors to Singapore? Designing and offering an experience on Airbnb is a great way to turn something you love into a cash-generating venture.

Technically, you can’t be tour-guiding around the island as you need a license from the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) to do that. However, what about giving a fun Singlish class in the park, or being a home chef?

You can check Airbnb’s Help Centre to learn more about the licenses that you may require for your experience. If the idea of sharing your home sounds really appealing, then why not apply for a tour guiding license from STB?

The best part of this job is, it won’t feel like a job!

Insurance and property agent

Selling insurance or property is not exactly a side-gig for those who want to commit as few hours as possible. Quite the opposite, being an insurance and property agent requires a lot of time, effort, and preparation, although it can bring in financial rewards that may even rival your full-time job.

In order to be a property or insurance agent, you need to take courses and examinations. This means commitment and investment of time and money, so you should be prepared to be in this for the medium to long haul to reap the benefits. Closing a deal on an S$1 million condo unit would fetch you about S$10,000 in commission (1%).  However, it is an industry that can have dramatic ups and downs, and you may go on for months before closing a deal.

At the moment, the property market has lost its shine with cooling measures in place.  However, if you get qualified and get started on gaining experience now, then you may be able to ride on the good times when they hopefully, eventually, come again.

Side-income jobs can be both interesting and financially rewarding, though they do leave you with little time for play.  Be sure to do your research and weigh the pros and cons before committing to one. Good luck!

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